Classes

Click here to see courses taken by recent Language and Brain Grad
students

Offered Fall and Spring 2012-2013

LIN 3010  Introduction to Linguistics
Instructor:  Varies

SPA 4004 Language Development
Instructor: Dr. Laurie Gauger (Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences)

In this undergraduate course we will explore the fundamental stages and processes of speech and language development. We will study components of the speech and language system (phonology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics). We will examine the course of development of these components. We will also discuss the biological bases of language and compare theories that attempt to account for speech and language development. Although our primary focus will be on typical patterns of development, we will also touch on development of language in special populations.

SPA 4104 Neurological Bases of Communication
Instructor: Dr. Lisa Edmonds   (Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences)

This introductory course presents fundamental concepts and basic information about the anatomy and physiology of the human nervous system with specific focus on neuroanatomy and processes related to communication and other cognitive-linguistic functions as well as an introduction to basic information related to clinical neuroradiology. Communication/cognition in aging and neuroplasticity in recovery will also be considered.

Clinical case presentations, including case history, neurological exam results, behavioral symptoms, and lesion information will be used to explore clinically relevant issues and to develop basic differential diagnosis skills. Clinical cases will focus on speech, language, and cognitive disorders.

EXP 3604: Cognitive Psychology
Instructor: Varies (Department of Psychology)

This course is an introductory survey of human cognitive abilities, including perceptual processes, attention, learning and memory, language, and thinking.  In addition to providing an overall understanding of these topics, this course will examine the research methodology used to study cognitive abilities, applications of these abilities to everyday life, and current issues in the field of cognitive psychology.  Students will also gain first-hand experience with research by studying, discussing, and writing about cognitive processes.

FALL COURSES

Brain and Language LIN4790 (undergraduate)
Instructor: Dr. Edith Kaan (Department of Linguistics)

In this course, major issues and terminology in brain and language research will be introduced. Topics addressed include: brain imaging techniques, ERPs, lesion studies, auditory perception, categorization in the brain, localizationist versus generalist approaches, symbolist versus connectionist approaches, modularity, innateness, critical period, lateralization, plasticity, hemispheric specialization. Students will be familiarized with important controversies related to these issues, and will learn to evaluate data from brain imaging research. In laboratory/work group sessions, students will have the opportunity to focus in on a particular topic

LIN 2704 – Language, Thought and Action: Language as a Cognitive System
Instructor: Dr. Wind Cowles.  (Department of Linguistics)

Approved for 3 Soc. Sciences General Education Credits.

While language is a fundamentally social behavior, the knowledge and use of language resides in individual human minds and so one important part of understanding language as a part of human society is to understand how language and human thought interact. This course counts toward the GenEd Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement by exploring this relationship between mind and language, in other words covering the cognitive aspects of language. In this course, you will be introduced to key themes and terminology in cognitive science and linguistics through the reading and discussion of current scientific papers covering research on a number of central topics. Specific topics include:

  • Animal communication in the wild and in the lab
  • Embodied language: metaphors, concepts and words
  • The impact of language on understanding space, time and color
  • Gesture, language and sign
  • Language evolution
    • Nature vs. Nurture: On being human and acquiring language

LIN 6707 – Advanced Psycholinguistics
Instructor: Dr. Wind Cowles (Department of Linguistics)

The goal of this graduate course is to provide an up-to-date introduction of the study of psycholinguistics, the discipline that stands at the crossroads of linguistics, psychology and neuroscience. It investigates and describes the mental processes involved in the acquisition, production and comprehension of language. It seeks answers to such questions as: How do we produce, perceive and recognize speech? How do we comprehend words and sentences? How do we acquire language? How is linguistic knowledge represented, structured and stored in our mind and brain, and how is it utilized in the real-time processing of language?

Lin4803/6804: Semantics 1 (Introduction to Semantics).
Instructor: Varies

Course Description: The course is an introduction to linguistic meaning and its role in communication. Students learn how diagnostic tests can be used to categorize and separate various semantic phenomena (e.g., ambiguity and vagueness, entailment, and presupposition), how basic set theory and logic can be used to specify meanings and explain semantic phenomena. The course will also examine the relationship between semantics and pragmatics. The latter concerns the study of meanings that are determined by linguistic communication in situated contexts, and that depend on the assumptions and intentions of language users.

GMS 6029.  Brain Journal Club (BJC): Language and the Brain. 
Instructor:  Dr. Christiana Leonard  1 credit  (Department of Neuroscience)
This is an “advanced” course for neuroscience concentrators in the IDP program and will concentrate on evidence for anatomical networks underlying the different aspects of language processing. Space may be available for other majors if the class does not fill with IDP students.  The organizing framework is Hickok and Poeppel’s perspective paper Nature Reviews Neuroscience 8:393; 2007.  Email: leonard@mbi.ufl.edu  for details.

CLP 7934 Cognitive Bases of Behavior
Instructor: Dr. William Perlstein,  (Department of Clinical and Health Psychology)

*Permission of instructor required for enrollment.

CLP 7934 Adult Neuropsychological Assessment
Instructor: Dawn Bowers, (Department of Clinical and Health Psychology)

*Permission of instructor required for enrollment.

SPRING COURSES

SPA 2109 Language Breakdown and the Brain.
Instructor: Dr. Lori Altmann (Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences)

This course introduces the structure of the brain particularly as it is related to language, followed by discussions of the impact of damage to the brain on language and cognition. We also discuss language development in normally developing children, as well as those with genetic differences that affect language use, such as dyslexia, specific language impairment, Williams Syndrome and Down Syndrome. Other topics covered include types of brain damage and the importance of neuroplasticity to learning and treatment. Emphasis is on learning scientific terms, concepts and theories, and being able to reason from these about various language disorders or the effects of different types of damage. Readings will be taken from introductory text books, Scientific American, and scientific journals. Provides 3 Bio Science GenEd Credits.

PSB 7248: Neuro-Behavioral Relationships
Instructor: Dr. Andreas Keil (Department of Psychology)

LIN 4701: Psycholinguistics

Instructor: Dr. Wind Cowles (Department of Linguistics)
This course is an introduction to the field of psycholinguistics. As such, it covers topics spanning all aspects of language processing. These include an introduction to basic linguistic principles and psychological mechanisms, language comprehension (from distinguishing sounds to understanding sentences and discourses), language production and conversational interaction, language acquisition processes and development, second language learning, biological foundations of language, and the relationship between language, culture and cognition.

LIN 6796-6842 Cognitive Neuroscience of Language
Instructor: Dr. Edith Kaan (Department of Linguistics)

Graduate seminar. Undergraduates can take this class as an independent study at the discretion of the instructor.

This lecture/seminar course gives an overview of brain imaging techniques and issues in language and brain research, focusing primarily on healthy adults. In addition, the course aims to teach students how to critically evaluate the use of brain imaging techniques such as fMRI and EEG to address psycholinguistic issues, and to improve their oral presentation skills. Lectures address major research questions and give an overview of current research in psycholinguistics, neurolinguistics and cognitive neuroscience. In the second half of the class, students present and discuss original research papers taken from journals in these areas. Each week a different aspect of language processing is dealt with: speech perception, word recognition, reading, word formation, sentence processing, discourse processing, language production, language acquisition and bilingualism. Along the way, more general issues will be addressed, including innateness, modularity, symbolic versus connectionist models, and localizationalist versus generalist approaches.

NOTE: This class has received ***** from previous LaB students!

DEP 4930: Development of Language and Cognition  

Instructor: Dr. Jeff Farrar (Department of Psychology)

This is an upper-level undergraduate seminar that covers conceptual issues in language and thought in both typical and atypical conditions. It includes some coverage of brain and language, 2nd language acquisition, WS, deafness, animal language, etc.

EEX 6125  Interventions for Language and Learning
Instructor: Dr. Linda Lombardino. Dept of SESPECS/College of Education

EEX  6936 Emergent Literacy Seminar.
Taught every spring in the Dept of SESPECS, area of Early Childhood Studies

The course is designed for graduate students interested in the linguistic, environmental, and biological factors that impact early literacy and in scientifically-based instruction for the prevention and remediation of reading difficulties.  The goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive  perspective on the skills and factors that contribute to the acquisition of reading and the factors that pose impediments to the acquisition of reading.  The course will be conducted as a seminar, not as a lecture. Hence, the instructor and students together will be responsible for discussing the weekly readings.

Summer Courses

SPA 6936 Neurocognitive Language Disorders. (Summer B)
Instructors: Dr. Jamie Reilly (Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences)

This course covers the language and cognitive impairments associated with disorders not usually associated with aphasia, including right hemisphere stroke, traumatic brain injury, and various dementias.  Interventions for these disorders are also discussed.

GMS 6705: Functional Human Neuroanatomy. (Summer B)
Dr. Louis A. Ritz, ritz@mbi.ufl.edu, (Dept of Neuroscience), 4 credits

Functional Human Neuroanatomy is a graduate level course offered by the Department of Neuroscience. This course is modeled after the Medical Neuroscience course, taken by 1st year medical students, and will cover topics related to the neuroanatomical underpinnings of central nervous system function and behavior. Functional Human Neuroanatomy is an intense 6 week course organized with both lecture and lab experiences. Lectures will include topics such as cellular neuroscience, systems neuroscience, and higher cortical functions. The anatomy lab will provide students with an extensive opportunity for a hands-on experience with human brains and brain sections. This course is geared for clinical- or research-oriented graduate students as well as pre-professional undergraduate students who have an interest in medicine or brain-related research (see prerequisites below).

Course Description: Functional Human Neuroanatomy is a Summer B, 4 credit-hour class that will run from June 30 to August 6, 2008. Lab introductions will be given in the morning, followed by structured lab time. Lectures will take place in the afternoon. This is a challenging class; we strongly discourage taking any other courses while taking this class. Those actively working in a research lab or with clients should expect to have limited time for research.

For registration, please contact BJ Streetman in the Dept of Neuroscience streetman@mbi.ufl.edu
**COM IDP students must register for the Summer C section, for funding considerations. Other students can register for the Summer B section. Contact BJ with questions.

 

Summer 2010

Summer A

EEX 6125  Interventions for Language and Learning
T Period 4-5, R Period 4-5
Instructor: Dr. Linda Lombardino

Department of Linguistics

LIN 3010  Introduction to Linguistics
M-F  period 2, MAT  016
Instructor:  Hee Im

Summer B (June 30-August 6, 2008)

Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences

SPA 6936 Neurocognitive Language Disorders. (Summer B)
T,R  Period 1 & 2, Pugh 120
Instructors: Dr. Jamie Reilly

This course covers the language and cognitive impairments associated with disorders not usually associated with aphasia, including right hemisphere stroke, traumatic brain injury, and various dementias.  Interventions for these disorders are also discussed.

Department of Neuroscience

GMS 6705: Functional Human Neuroanatomy
Louis A. Ritz, PhD : Dept of Neuroscience, ritz@mbi.ufl.edu, 4 credits

Functional Human Neuroanatomy is a graduate level course offered by the Department of Neuroscience. This course is modeled after the Medical Neuroscience course, taken by 1st year medical students, and will cover topics related to the neuroanatomical underpinnings of central nervous system function and behavior. Functional Human Neuroanatomy is an intense 6 week course organized with both lecture and lab experiences. Lectures will include topics such as cellular neuroscience, systems neuroscience, and higher cortical functions. The anatomy lab will provide students with an extensive opportunity for a hands-on experience with human brains and brain sections. This course is geared for clinical- or research-oriented graduate students as well as pre-professional undergraduate students who have an interest in medicine or brain-related research (see prerequisites below).

Course Description: Functional Human Neuroanatomy is a Summer B, 4 credit-hour class that will run from June 30 to August 6, 2008. Lab introductions will be given in the morning, followed by structured lab time. Lectures will take place in the afternoon. This is a challenging class; we strongly discourage taking any other courses while taking this class. Those actively working in a research lab or with clients should expect to have limited time for research.

For registration, please contact BJ Streetman in the Dept of Neuroscience streetman@mbi.ufl.edu
**COM IDP students must register for the Summer C section, for funding considerations. Other students can register for the Summer B section. Contact BJ with questions.

Classes for Fall 2010

Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences

SPA 4004 Language Development
MWF Period 10, FLG 230
Instructor: Rebecca Wiseheart, ABD, MA-CCC

In this undergraduate course we will explore the fundamental stages and processes of speech and language development. We will study components of the speech and language system (phonology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics). We will examine the course of development of these components. We will also discuss the biological bases of language and compare theories that attempt to account for speech and language development. Although our primary focus will be on typical patterns of development, we will also touch on development of language in special populations.

SPA 4104 Neurological Bases of Communication
T 4, R 4-5, Turlington 011
Instructor: Dr. Lisa Edmonds

This introductory course presents fundamental concepts and basic information about the anatomy and physiology of the human nervous system with specific focus on neuroanatomy and processes related to communication and other cognitive-linguistic functions as well as an introduction to basic information related to clinical neuroradiology. Communication/cognition in aging and neuroplasticity in recovery will also be considered.

Clinical case presentations, including case history, neurological exam results, behavioral symptoms, and lesion information will be used to explore clinically relevant issues and to develop basic differential diagnosis skills. Clinical cases will focus on speech, language, and cognitive disorders.

SPA 7938: Diagnosis and Treatment of Language and Language-Based Literacy Disorders. T TBA. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
Instructior: Dr. Linda Lombardino

Department of Linguistics

LIN 2704 – Language, Thought and Action: Language as a Cognitive System
Tuesdays Period 4, Thursdays Periods 4-5, Anderson Hall 19
Instructor: Dr. Wind Cowles

While language is a fundamentally social behavior, the knowledge and use of language resides in individual human minds and so one important part of understanding language as a part of human society is to understand how language and human thought interact. This course counts toward the GenEd Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement by exploring this relationship between mind and language, in other words covering the cognitive aspects of language. In this course, you will be introduced to key themes and terminology in cognitive science and linguistics through the reading and discussion of current scientific papers covering research on a number of central topics. Specific topics include:

  • Animal communication in the wild and in the lab
  • Embodied language: metaphors, concepts and words
  • The impact of language on understanding space, time and color
  • Gesture, language and sign
  • Language evolution
  • Nature vs. Nurture: On being human and acquiring language

Approved for 3 Soc. Sciences General Education Credits.

Brain and Language LIN4790 (undergraduate)
*Prerequisite :*LIN3010 or SPA 4004 or 4104 with permission of the instructor
Instructor: Dr. Edith Kaan

In this course, major issues and terminology in brain and language research will be introduced. Topics addressed include: brain imaging techniques, ERPs, lesion studies, auditory perception, categorization in the brain, localizationist versus generalist approaches, symbolist versus connectionist approaches, modularity, innateness, critical period, lateralization, plasticity, hemispheric specialization. Students will be familiarized with important controversies related to these issues, and will learn to evaluate data from brain imaging research. In laboratory/work group sessions, students will have the opportunity to focus in on a particular topic

Lin4803/6804: Semantics 1 (Introduction to Semantics).
M8-10 periods, in Anderson 13
Instructor: Hana Filip (hana.filip@gmail.com), http://plaza.ufl.edu/hfilip

Course Description: The course is an introduction to linguistic meaning and its role in communication. Students learn how diagnostic tests can be used to categorize and separate various semantic phenomena (e.g., ambiguity and vagueness, entailment, and presupposition), how basic set theory and logic can be used to specify meanings and explain semantic phenomena. The course will also examine the relationship between semantics and pragmatics. The latter concerns the study of meanings that are determined by linguistic communication in situated contexts, and that depend on the assumptions and intentions of language users.

LIN 6707 – Advanced Psycholinguistics
(Wednesdays Periods 7-9, Turlington Hall 4104)
Instructor: Wind Cowles, Ph.D.

The goal of this graduate course is to provide an up-to-date introduction of the study of psycholinguistics, the discipline that stands at the crossroads of linguistics, psychology and neuroscience. It investigates and describes the mental processes involved in the acquisition, production and comprehension of language. It seeks answers to such questions as: How do we produce, perceive and recognize speech? How do we comprehend words and sentences? How do we acquire language? How is linguistic knowledge represented, structured and stored in our mind and brain, and how is it utilized in the real-time processing of language?
Readings will be from The Psychology of Language by Trevor Harley and current research papers.

Department of Psychology

EXP 3604: Cognitive Psychology
MWF 6, in NEB 100.
Instructor: Dr. Lise Abrams

This course is an introductory survey of human cognitive abilities, including perceptual processes, attention, learning and memory, language, and thinking.  In addition to providing an overall understanding of these topics, this course will examine the research methodology used to study cognitive abilities, applications of these abilities to everyday life, and current issues in the field of cognitive psychology.  Students will also gain first-hand experience with research by studying, discussing, and writing about cognitive processes.

PSB 7248: Neuro-Behavioral Relationships
M Period 9-11, PSY -129.
Instructor: Dr. Andreas Keil

Department of Educational Psychology

EDF 6215: EdPsych: Learning Theory
Dr. Tracy Linderholm

Students in this course will review the literature in the learning theory domain and determine what types of educational practices (e.g., instructional techniques, learning strategies) may be derived from them. Learning theories covered include behaviorism, social cognitive theory, and the cognitive view.

Department of Neuroscience/IDP

GMS 6029.  Brain Journal Club (BJC): Language and the Brain. 
Wednesday noon in McKnight Brain Institute, rm. L1-101.
Instructor:  Dr. Christiana Leonard
1 credit
First class Sep 1

This is an “advanced” course for neuroscience concentrators in the IDP program and will concentrate on evidence for anatomical networks underlying the different aspects of language processing. Space may be available for other majors if the class does not fill with IDP students.  The organizing framework is Hickok and Poeppel’s perspective paper Nature Reviews Neuroscience 8:393; 2007.  Email: leonard@mbi.ufl.edu  for details.

Department of Clinical and Health Psychology

CLP 7934 Cognitive Bases of Behavior
R 6-9
Instructor: Dr. William Perlsteing
*Permission of instructor required for enrollment.

CLP 7934 Adult Neuropsychological Assessment
W 2-5
Instructor: Dawn Bowers
*Permission of instructor required for enrollment.

Classes for Spring 2011

Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences

SPA 2109 Language Breakdown and the Brain.
T 8, R 8-9th Periods, FAB 105
Instructor: Dr. Lori Altmann

This course introduces the structure of the brain particularly as it is related to language, followed by discussions of the impact of damage to the brain on language and cognition. We also discuss language development in normally developing children, as well as those with genetic differences that affect language use, such as dyslexia, specific language impairment, Williams Syndrome and Down Syndrome. Other topics covered include types of brain damage and the importance of neuroplasticity to learning and treatment. Emphasis is on learning scientific terms, concepts and theories, and being able to reason from these about various language disorders or the effects of different types of damage. Readings will be taken from introductory text books, Scientific American, and scientific journals. Provides 3 Bio Science GenEd Credits.

SPA 4004: Language Development
Instructor: TBA
Time: M 6-8 period, LEI 0242

In this undergraduate course we will explore the fundamental stages and processes of speech and language development. We will study components of the speech and language system (phonology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics). We will examine the course of development of these components. We will also discuss the biological bases of language and compare theories that attempt to account for speech and language development. Although our primary focus will be on typical patterns of development, we will also touch on development of language in special populations.

Department of Linguistics

LIN 4701: Psycholinguistics (taught by Dr. Wind Cowles)
MWF Period 6, Anderson Hall room 13

This course is an introduction to the field of psycholinguistics. As such, it covers topics spanning all aspects of language processing. These include an introduction to basic linguistic principles and psychological mechanisms, language comprehension (from distinguishing sounds to understanding sentences and discourses), language production and conversational interaction, language acquisition processes and development, second language learning, biological foundations of language, and the relationship between language, culture and cognition.

LIN 6796-6842 Cognitive Neuroscience of Language
Graduate seminar. Undergraduates can take this class as an independent study at the discretion of the instructor.
Instructor: Edith Kaan
Tuesdays 9-11 period, Room: Matherly 003.

This lecture/seminar course gives an overview of brain imaging techniques and issues in language and brain research, focusing primarily on healthy adults. In addition, the course aims to teach students how to critically evaluate the use of brain imaging techniques such as fMRI and EEG to address psycholinguistic issues, and to improve their oral presentation skills. Lectures address major research questions and give an overview of current research in psycholinguistics, neurolinguistics and cognitive neuroscience. In the second half of the class, students present and discuss original research papers taken from journals in these areas. Each week a different aspect of language processing is dealt with: speech perception, word recognition, reading, word formation, sentence processing, discourse processing, language production, language acquisition and bilingualism. Along the way, more general issues will be addressed, including innateness, modularity, symbolic versus connectionist models, and localizationalist versus generalist approaches.

NOTE: This class has received ***** from previous LaB students!

Department of Psychology

DEP 4930: Development of Language and Cognition (taught by Dr. Jeff Farrar)

This is an upper-level undergraduate seminar that covers conceptual issues in language and thought in both typical and atypical conditions. It includes some coverage of brain and language, 2nd language acquisition, WS, deafness, animal language, etc.

College of Education

EEX  6XXX Emergent Literacy Seminar.
Taught every spring in the Dept of SESPECS, area of Early Childhood Studies

The course is designed for graduate students interested in the linguistic, environmental, and biological factors that impact early literacy and in scientifically-based instruction for the prevention and remediation of reading difficulties.  The goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive  perspective on the skills and factors that contribute to the acquisition of reading and the factors that pose impediments to the acquisition of reading.  The course will be conducted as a seminar, not as a lecture. Hence, the instructor and students together will be responsible for discussing the weekly readings.

More to come!

Electives for a program in Language and Brain

CLP 6307: Human Higher Cortical Function
CLP 7934: Subcortical Functional Cognition
CLP 7934: Subcortical Functions of Language
CLP 7934: Cognitive Bases of Behavior
CLP 7934: Experimental Methods in Clinical Neuropsychology (fMRI)
??? 6705: Functional Human Neuroanatomy
DEP 4930: Development of Language and Thought
EDF 6938: Cognitive Psychology of Reading
EDF 6938: Developmental Issues in Cognitive Psychology of Reading
EDF 6938: Individual Differences in Reading Processes
EXP 4505: Human Memory
EXP 6099: Current Issues in Cognitive and Sensory Processes
EXP 6939: Language Production and Aging
LIN 6707: Advanced Psycholinguistics
LIN 6708: Methods in Psycholinguistics
LIN 6708: Sentence Comprehension
LIN 6796: Cognitive Neuroscience of Language
RSD 6110: Rehabilitation Science Theory and Application
RSD 6705: Rasch Analysis
SPA 6938: Controversies in Adult Language Disorders
SPA 7415: Neurolinguistics of Adult Language Disorders