Speech Fluency

Welcome! The Speech Fluency Laboratory is located in Dauer Hall, Room 56. For more than 20 years, the lab has been devoted, primarily, to applied research related to neurodevelopmental stuttering. More recently, we have expanded our focus to incorporate acquired stuttering. Recent lab research has focused on four main lines of study: (1) the characteristics of communicative contexts that are most/least likely to elicit stutter-like disfluency; (2) the impact of fluency impairment on individuals’ communicative functioning and quality of life, (3) listener reactions to and evaluations of various types of fluent and disfluent speech, and (4) methods for improving the accuracy, reliability, and efficiency of fluency assessment measures.

Current Lab Projects

  • In development: Listeners’ perceptions of speech samples characterized by glottal register (Taylor & Logan [MA Thesis])
  • Currently in progress: Determining the Duration of Stutter-Like Disfluencies: Is Estimation as Accurate as Use of a Stopwatch?
  • Manuscript in preparation: Listeners’ judgments of naturalness and effort during speech.(Logan & Hodgman)
  • Manuscript in preparation: How well do contemporary disfluency taxonomies characterize speakers’ actual speech disfluencies? (Chakraborty & Logan)
  • Manuscript in preparation: Metrical characteristics of frequently and infrequently stuttered phonological phrases. (Logan, Schwartz & Chakraborty)
  • Manuscript in preparation: Speech Intelligibility Under Background Noise and Loud Speech Conditions in Individuals with Parkinson’s Disease (Chakraborty, Logan, Altmann, Hegland)
  • Manuscript in preparation: Effects of auditory masking and speaking loudly on speech fluency in individuals with Parkinson’s disease. (Chakraborty, Hegland, Altmann & Logan)
  • Manuscript in preparation: Relationships between written passage difficulty and stuttered speech. (Byrd, Logan, & Gillam)
  • Manuscript in preparation: A survey of college students with a history of /r/ misarticulation (Hoogland & Logan)

Examples of Publications and Presentations from the Lab

  • Chakraborty N. & Logan, K. J. (2018). Effects of measurement method and transcript availability on inexperienced raters’ stuttering frequency scores. Journal of Communication Disorders, 74, 23-34, DOI: 10.1016/j.jcomdis.2018.04.006
  • Chakraborty, N., Altmann, L., Hegland, K., & Logan, K. (2018, November). Effects of auditory masking and speaking loudly on speech fluency in individuals with Parkinson’s disease. Poster presentation at the Annual Convention of American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Boston, MA.
  • Logan, K. J. & Gillam, R. (2018, November). Effect of training method, response mode, and disfluency type on listeners’ assessments of disfluency duration. Poster presentation at the Annual Convention of American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Boston, MA.
  • Logan, K. J., Byrd, C. T., & Gillam, R. (2018, November). Characteristics of written passages that are effective for use in assessing stuttered speech. Poster presentation at the Annual Convention of American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Boston, MA.
  • Logan, K. J., Schwartz, S., & Chakraborty, N. (2018, January). The metrical context of frequently- and infrequently-stuttered phonological phrases. Podium presentation at the 12th Annual Meeting of the Auditory Cognitive Neuroscience Society, Tampa, FL.
  • Logan, K. J. (2017). Combined modality fluency therapy in a teenager with severe stuttering. In R. Branski & S. Molfenter (Eds.) Thieme’s eCommunicationScience/Speech-Language Pathology Casebooks.
  • Hoogland, E., & Logan, K. J. (2017, November). Residual Articulation Errors in Adults: Epidemiology, Characteristics & Impact. Poster presentation at the Annual Convention of American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Los Angeles, CA.
  • Carbaugh, C., & Logan, K. J. (2017, November). Identifying stuttered syllables accurately & reliably: A comparison of dichotomous & ordinal Scoring. Poster presentation at the Annual Convention of American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Los Angeles, CA.
  • Logan, K. J. (2016, April). Helping people who stutter to communicate effectively: Evidence-based principles and strategies. National Stuttering Association CEU Event, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL.
  • Logan, K. J., Blomgren, M., Manning, W., & Gillam, R. (2016, November). The long view: Perspectives on coping with and managing persistent stuttering over the lifespan. Oral Seminar presentation at the Annual Convention of American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Philadelphia, PA.
  • Logan, K. J., & Chakraborty, N. (2016, November). Stressed out: Application of metrical phonology in identifying the location stuttered syllables. Poster presentation at the Annual Convention of American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Philadelphia, PA.
  • Peña, D., & Logan, K. J. (2015, November). An analysis of structural components in stuttering modification therapy: Implications for treatment outcomes research. Poster presentation at the Annual Convention of American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Denver, CO.
  • Park, J., & Logan, K. J., (2015). The role of temporal speech cues in facilitating the fluency of adults who stutter. Journal of Fluency Disorders, 46, 41-55.
  • Byrd, C.T., Logan, K. J., & Gillam, R.B. (2012). Speech disfluency in school-age children’s conversational and narrative discourse. Language, Speech, & Hearing Services in Schools, 43, 153-163.
  • Logan, K. J., & O’Connor, E.M. (2012). Factors affecting occupational advice for speakers who do and do not stutter. Journal of Fluency Disorders, 37, 25-41.
  • Logan, K. J. & Willis, J.R. (2011). The accuracy with which adults who do not stutter predict stuttering-related communication attitudes. Journal of Fluency Disorders, 36, 334-348.
  • Logan, K.J., Byrd, C.T., Mazzocchi, E.M., & Gillam, R.B. (2011). Speaking rate characteristics of elementary-aged children who do and do not stutter. Journal of Communication Disorders, 44, 130-147.

Recent Doctoral Dissertations, MA and Undergraduate Theses

  • Schwartz, S. (2017). Prosodic characteristics of typical speakers’ oral reading. Senior Honor’s Thesis.
  • Hoogland, E. (2017). A survey of college students with a history of /r/ misarticulation. Senior Honor’s Thesis.
  • Tolar, A. (2017). Characteristics of fluency development in two year-old-children. Master’s Thesis.
  • Carbaugh, C. (2017). Effect of multi-dimensional fluency training on reliability of inexperienced raters’ stuttering judgments. Senior Honor’s Thesis
  • Conway, A., (2015). Factors that affect spelling proficiency in school-aged children with reading disability. Master’s thesis.
  • Vallejo, N. (2015). A review of research literature on the neurolinguistic bases of normal and disordered sign language. Senior Honor’s Thesis.

Lab Assistants/Volunteers

  • Nalanda Chakraborty
  • Carla Corsetti
  • Kayli Kvistad